Home Black Hat Deep Tech Essays Fireside Chat My Take News Alerts Q&A RSAC Videocasts About Contact
 

Top Stories

 

MY TAKE: GenAI revolution — the transformative power of ordinary people conversing with AI

By Byron V. Acohido

San Francisco, Calif. — The amazing digital services we have today wouldn’t have come to fruition without the leading technology and telecom giants investing heavily in R&D.

Related: GenAi empowers business

I had the chance to attend NTT Research’s Upgrade Reality 2024 conference here  last week to get a glimpse at some of what’s coming next.

My big takeaway: GenAI is hyper-accelerating advancements in upcoming digital systems – and current ones too. This is about to become very apparent as the software tools and services we’re familiar with become GenAI-enabled in the weeks and months ahead.

And by the same token, GenAI, or more specifically Large Language Model (LLM,) has added a turbo boost to the pet projects that R&D teams across the technology and telecom sectors have in the works.

The ramifications are staggering. The ability for any human to extract value from a large cache of data – using conversational language opens up a whole new universe of possibilities.

News alert: Simbian launches with $10M to build autonomous, GenAI-powered security platform

Mountain View, Calif. – April 11, 2024 – Simbian today emerged from stealth mode with oversubscribed $10M seed funding to deliver on fully autonomous security.

As a first step towards that goal, the company is introducing the industry’s first GenAI-powered security co-pilot that integrates secure and intelligent AI solutions into diverse IT environments to maximize coverage and expedite resolutions to security teams’ ever-changing needs.

The co-pilot continuously observes user actions and environments, and learns to autonomously perform increasingly sophisticated tasks on its own with time. Simbian is committed to making security fully autonomous by delegating all tactical tasks to its trusted AI platform, allowing users to focus on strategic security goals.

Simbian, the name derived from the symbiotic relationship between humans and AI, has received initial investment from security and AI-focused investors Cota Capital, Icon Ventures, Firebolt and Rain Capital. Its founding team comprises leading AI researchers and security veterans who have created security products in broad use across enterprises today,

Best Practices Q&A: Guidance about what directors need to hear from CISOs — from a board member

By Byron V. Acohido

CISOs can sometimes be their own worst enemy, especially when it comes to communicating with the board of directors.

Related: The ‘cyber’ case for D&O insurance

Vanessa Pegueros knows this all too well. She serves on the board of several technology companies and also happens to be steeped in cyber risk governance.

I recently attended an IoActive-sponsored event in Seattle at which Pegueros gave a presentation titled: “Merging Cybersecurity, the Board & Executive Team”

Pegueros shed light on the land mines that enshroud cybersecurity presentations made at the board level. She noted that most board members are non-technical, especially when it comes to the intricate nuances of cybersecurity, and that their decision-making is primarily driven by concerns about revenue and costs.

Thus, presenting a sky-is-falling scenario to justify a fatter security budget, “does not resonate at the board level,” she said in her talk. “Board members must be very optimistic; they have to believe in the vision for the company. And to some extent, they don’t always deal with the reality of what the situation really is.

MY TAKE: Why email security desperately needs retooling in this post-Covid 19, GenAI era

By Byron V. Acohido

It’s a digital swindle as old as the internet itself, and yet, as the data tells us, the vast majority of security incidents are still rooted in the low-tech art of social engineering.

Related: AI makes scam email look real

Fresh evidence comes from  Mimecast’s “The State of Email and Collaboration Security” 2024 report.

The London-based supplier of email security technology, surveyed 1,100 information technology and cybersecurity professionals worldwide and found:

•Human risk remains a massive exposure. Some 74 percent of cyber breaches are caused by human factors, including errors, stolen credentials, misuse of access privileges, or social engineering.

•New AI risks have lit a fire under IT teams. . Eight out of 10 of those polled expressed concerned about AI threats posed and 67 percent said AI-driven attacks will soon become the norm.

Best Practices Q&A: The importance of articulating how cybersecurity can be a business enabler

By Byron V. Acohido

The technology and best practices for treating cybersecurity as a business enabler, instead of an onerous cost-center, have long been readily available.

Related: Data privacy vs data security

However, this remains a novel concept at most companies. Now comes a Forrester Research report that vividly highlights why attaining and sustaining a robust cybersecurity posture translates into a competitive edge.

The report, titled “Embed Cybersecurity And Privacy Everywhere To Secure Your Brand And Business,” argues for a paradigm shift. It’s logical that robust cybersecurity and privacy practices need become intrinsic in order to tap the full potential of massively interconnected, highly interoperable digital systems.

Forrester’s report lays out a roadmap for CIOs, CISOs and privacy directors to drive this transformation – by weaving informed privacy and security practices into every facet of their business; this runs the gamut from physical and information assets to customer experiences and investment strategies.

Last Watchdog engaged Forrester analyst Heidi Shey, the report’s lead author, in a discussion about how this could play out well, and contribute to an overall greater good. Here’s that exchange, edited for clarity and length.

GUEST ESSAY: NIST’s Cybersecurity Framework update extends best practices to supply chain, AI

By Jeremy Swenson

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has updated their widely used Cybersecurity Framework (CSF) — a free respected landmark guidance document for reducing cybersecurity risk.

Related: More background on CSF

However, it’s important to note that most of the framework core has remained the same. Here are the core components the security community knows:

Govern (GV): Sets forth the strategic path and guidelines for managing cybersecurity risks, ensuring harmony with business goals and adherence to legal requirements and standards. This is the newest addition which was inferred before but is specifically illustrated to touch every aspect of the framework. It seeks to establish and monitor your company’s cybersecurity risk management strategy, expectations, and policy.

•Identify (ID): Entails cultivating a comprehensive organizational comprehension of managing cybersecurity risks to systems, assets, data, and capabilities.

LW ROUNDTABLE: Will the U.S. Senate keep citizens safe, vote to force China to divest TikTok?

By Byron V. Acohido

Congressional bi-partisanship these day seems nigh impossible.

Related: Rising tensions spell need for tighter cybersecurity

Yet by a resounding vote of 352-65, the U.S. House of Representatives recently passed a bill that would ban TikTok unless its China-based owner, ByteDance Ltd., relinquishes its stake.

President Biden has said he will sign the bill into law, so its fate is now in the hands of the U.S. Senate.

I fervently hope the U.S. Senate does not torpedo this long overdue proactive step to protect its citizens and start shoring up America’s global stature.

Weaponizing social media

How did we get here? A big part of the problem is a poorly informed general populace. Mainstream news media gravitates to chasing the political antics of the moment. This tends to diffuse sober analysis of the countless examples of Russia, in particular, weaponizing social media to spread falsehoods, interfere in elections, target infrastructure and even radicalize youth.