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Steps forward

 

NEW TECH: Alcide introduces a “microservices firewall” as a dynamic ‘IaaS’ market takes shape

By Byron V. Acohido

As a tech reporter at USA TODAY, I wrote stories about how Google fractured Microsoft’s Office monopoly, and then how Google clawed ahead of Apple to dominate the global smartphone market.

Related: A path to fruition of ‘SecOps’

And now for Act 3, Google has thrown down the gauntlet at Amazon, challenging the dominant position of Amazon Web Services in the fast-emerging cloud infrastructure global market.

I recently sat down with Gadi Naor, CTO and co-founder of Alcide, to learn more about the “microservices firewall” this Tel Aviv-based security start-up is pioneering. However, in diving into what Alcide is up to, Gadi and I segued into a stimulating discussion about this latest clash of tech titans. Here are key takeaways:

Google’s Kubernetes play

First some context. Just about every large enterprise today relies on software written by far-flung  third-party developers, who specialize in creating modular “microservices” that can get mixed and matched and reused inside of software “containers.” This is how companies have begun to  scale the delivery of cool new digital services — at high velocity.

The legacy ‘on-premises’ data centers enterprises installed 10 to 20 years ago are inadequate to  support this new approach. Thus, digital infrastructure is being shifted to “serverless” cloud computing services, with AWS blazing the trail and Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud in hot pursuit.

Microservices and containers have been around for a long while, to be sure. Google, for instance, has long made use of the equivalent of microservices and containers, internally, to scale the development and deployment of the leading-edge software it uses to run its businesses. …more

Q&A: How cutting out buzzwords could actually ease implementation of powerful security tools

By Byron V. Acohido

The central dilemma posed by digital transformation is this: How do companies reap the benefits of high-velocity software development without creating onerous security exposures?

Related: Golden Age of cyber spying dawns

The best practices standards and protocols to pull off this delicate balancing act have been thoroughly vetted and are readily available. And there’s certainly no shortage of sophisticated technology solutions.

So what’s missing? Why have organizations, of all sizes and in all sectors, failed to make more progress shrinking a security gap that appears, in fact, to be inexorably widening?

These were questions I discussed at RSA 2019 with Samantha Madrid, a veteran executive in the enterprise security space, who recently joined Juniper Networks as vice president, security & business strategy. Juniper has been in the vanguard of integrating security deeper into the plumbing of modern business networks.

Madrid observed that the white noise of overlapping marketing messages has not made it any easier for enterprises to chart a truer course for securing their networks. One of the first things Madrid told me she did when she arrived at Juniper was to ask her colleagues to stop using marketing buzzwords.

“A vendor should be able to explain, in simple terms, how they can help solve a customer’s problem,” she said.

Having covered tech security since 2004, I can attest that there is plenty of room for more clarity, and less hype, in security products marketing. To hear my conversation with Madrid in its entirety, please give a listen to the accompanying podcast. Here are excerpts edited for clarity and length.

LW:  Can you frame the security challenges companies are facing in today’s very dynamic environment? …more

NEW TECH: Critical Start delivers managed security services with ‘radical transparency’

By Byron V. Acohido

It was in 2012 that CRITICALSTART burst onto the Managed Security Service Provider (MSSP) scene with bold intentions.

Related: How SMBs can leverage threat intelligence.

The Plano, TX-based company sought to elevate the “MSSP” space high above the accepted standard at the time. It set out to do this by delivering security services based on Zero-Trust and that also provided radical transparency to its customers.

CRITICALSTART has since grown to 105 employees, serving hundreds of customers. In 2018, revenues generated by its core Managed Detection and Response (MDR) service grew 300 percent as compared to 2017.

What struck me most as I prepared to meet up with Jordan Mauriello, CRITICALSTART’s VP of Managed Services, was how the company has been able to stick to its guns providing Zero-Trust and “radical transparency” to its customers.

No one in the cybersecurity community would dispute the fact that widely sharing intel detailing what the bad guys are doing, as well as measures that prove effective in deterring them, should be standard practice – for the greater good.

However, in reality, competitive instincts still get in the way all too often. It was with this in mind that I met with Mauriello at RSA 2019, and he walked me through the path CRITICALSTART has successfully navigated. For a full drill down, give a listen to the accompanying podcast. Here are key takeaways:

Foundation of trust

Radical transparency isn’t a new thing, but we are seeing it more in security, as well as an increase in the need for Zero-Trust model. Mauriello observed that companies shopping for contracted security services are open to taking a trust-but-verify approach, and are looking for service providers to build that trust foundation by operating out in the open. …more

NEW TECH: ‘Network Traffic Analysis’ gets to ground truth about data moving inside the perimeter

By Byron V. Acohido

Digital transformation is all about high-velocity innovation. But velocity cuts two ways.

Related: Obsolescence creeps into perimeter defenses

Yes, the rapid integration of digital technologies into all aspects of commerce has enabled wonderful new services. But it has also translated into an exponential expansion of the attack surface available to cyber criminals.

This has led us to the current environment in which security threats are multiplying even as network breaches grow costlier and more frequent.

However, a newly-minted security sub-specialty —  christened Network Traffic Analysis, or NTA, by Gartner — holds some fresh promise for getting to the root of the problem. I had the chance to sit down at RSA 2019 with ExtraHop Networks, a Seattle-based supplier of NTA systems.

ExtraHop’s CISO Jeff Costlow walked me through what’s different about the approach NTA vendors are taking to help companies detect and deter leading-edge threats. For a drill down, give a listen to the accompanying podcast. Key takeaways:

NTA’s distinctions

Software development today routinely occurs at high velocity in order to build the digital services we can’t live without. Modular microservices, software containers and orchestration tools get spun up, using open source components; all of this mixing and matching occurs in the internet cloud, keeping things moving right along.

The inevitable security gaps that get created as part of this highly dynamic process have been getting short shrift, in deference to shipping deadlines. It’s not as though legacy security vendors are asleep at the wheel; they’ve been applying machine learning and AI to the output of SIEMs, firewalls, intrusion detection and other traditional security products designed to filter and detect malicious traffic directed at, and coming through, the perimeter. …more

Cloud computing 101: basic types and business advantages of cloud-delivered services

By Mike James

If you are looking for a simpler method of managing issues such as storage, software, servers and database, cloud computing could have the answers that your business needs. The cloud is becoming increasingly popular around the world, as organisations are starting to understand the organisational and cost benefits to using them.

Related: Using a ‘zero-trust’ managed security service

In this article we will take a look at the different types of cloud computing services available to see whether this might be something suitable for your business.

Four types

Before you can establish whether or not cloud computing is right for your business, it is necessary to understand the differences between the forms of cloud computing that are available to you. Known by the …more

NEW TECH: Exabeam retools SIEMs; applies credit card fraud detection tactics to network logs

By Byron V. Acohido

Security information and event management, or SIEM, could yet turn out to be the cornerstone technology for securing enterprise networks as digital transformation unfolds.

Related: How NSA cyber weapon could be used for a $200 billion ransomware caper

Exabeam is a bold upstart in the SIEM space. The path this San Mateo, CA-based vendor is trodding tells us a lot about the unfolding renaissance of SIEMs – and where it could take digital commerce.

Launched in 2013 by Nir Polak, a former top exec at web application firewall vendor Imperva, Exabeam in just half a decade has raised an eye-popping $115 million in venture capital, grown to almost 350 employees and reaped over 100 percent revenue growth in each of the last three years.

I had the chance to visit with Trevor Daughney, Exabeam’s vice president of product marketing at RSA 2019. He explained how Exabeam has taken some of the same data analytics techniques that banks have long used to staunch credit card fraud and applied them to filtering network data logs. For a full drill down on our conversation, please listen to the accompanying podcast. Here are a few takeaways:

Very Big Data

The earliest SIEMs cropped up around 2005 or so. Led by the likes of Splunk, LogRhythm, IBM and Exabeam, the global SIEM market is expected to grow to over $5 billion annually in 2022.

Related: Autonomous vehicles are driving IoT security innovation

Fundamentally, SIEMs collect event log data from internet traffic, as well as corporate hardware and software assets. The starting idea was for a security analyst to then sift meaningful security intelligence from a massive volume of potential security events and keep intruders out. Yet, SIEMs never quite lived up to their initial promise.

And now, Big Data is about to become Very Big Data. Consider that 90 percent of the data that exists in the world today was generated in just the past couple of years. That includes everything moving across the internet: email, texting, online searches, social media posts, entertainment streaming, global finance, scientific research and cyber warfare. And on the horizon loom a full blown Internet of Things (IoT) and 5G networks, which will drive data generation to new heights. …more

BEST PRACTICES: 6 physical security measures every company needs

By Mike James

It has never been more important to invest in proper security for your business. Laws surrounding the personal data of individuals such as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) put the onus on companies to ensure that both digital and physical copies of data are secure at all times.

Related: Shrinking to human attack vector

Gaining access to your property can provide criminals with the ability not only to steal physical items from your premises, but also to potentially infect computers with malware or access data through your IT infrastructure. Here are six physical security measures that you can put in place to help keep your company secure.

Access controls

Clearly your business needs to have some method of access control …more