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Steps forward

 

NetSecOPEN names founding members, appoints inaugural board of directors

SAN JOSE, Calif. – Dec. 11, 2018 – NetSecOPEN, the first industry organization focused on the creation of open, transparent network security performance testing standards, today announced that 11 prominent security vendors, test solutions and services vendors, and testing laboratories have joined the organization as founding members.

Related podcast: The importance of sharing alliances

The organization also announced the appointment of its first board of directors, who will guide NetSecOPEN toward its goal: making open network security testing standards a reality.

These developments signal decisive momentum for the organization, which formed in 2017 to close the gap between proprietary performance metrics and the observed real-world performance of security solutions.  Certification of security product performance today is typically conducted by independent testing laboratories using proprietary testing methodologies.

True “apples-to-apples” evaluations of security products pose a challenge for enterprise buyers, because the methodologies and test criteria differ from lab to lab. NetSecOPEN believes that testing methodology requires greater transparency, consensus, and standardization, and that real-world factors need to be integrated into the testing methodology.

The NetSecOPEN standard is designed to provide metrics that can be used to compare solutions fairly and to understand the impact on network performance of different solutions under the same conditions. The goal is to examine the performance ramifications of a solution with all of that solution’s security features enabled, conveying the true costs of the solution.

“There is great urgency for open, transparent standards for the testing of network security equipment,” said Brian Monkman, executive director of NetSecOPEN. “Today, security professionals face significant challenges when evaluating, deploying, and optimizing new solutions. Similar product specifications may deliver different results, and products often behave differently with real-world traffic than they do in lab environments. …more

GUEST ESSAY: 5 security steps all companies should adopt from the Intelligence Community

By Angela Hill and Edwin Hill

The United States Intelligence Community, or IC, is a federation of 16 separate U.S. intelligence agencies, plus a 17th administrative office.

The IC gathers, stores and processes large amounts of data, from a variety of sources,  in order to provide actionable information for key stakeholders. And, in doing so, the IC has developed an effective set of data handling and cybersecurity best practices.

Related video: Using the NIST framework as a starting point

Businesses at large would do well to model their data collection and security processes after what the IC refers to as the “intelligence cycle.” This cycle takes a holistic approach to detecting and deterring external threats and enforcing best-of-class data governance procedures.

The IC has been using this approach to generate reliable and accurate intelligence that is the basis for making vital national security decisions, in particular, those having to do with protecting critical U.S. infrastructure from cyber attacks.

In the same vein, businesses at large can use the intelligence cycle as a model to detect and deter any attacks coming from foreign intelligence services. Such threats impact more businesses than you may think.

Per a 2017 CNN source, nearly 100,000 agents from as many as 80 nations operate within the United States with the intention of targeting businesses to gain …more

MY TAKE: Why security innovations paving the way for driverless cars will make IoT much safer

By Byron V. Acohido

Intelligent computing systems have been insinuating themselves into our homes and public gathering places for a while now.

But smart homes, smart workplaces and smart shopping malls are just the warm-up act. Get ready for smart ground transportation.

Related: Michigan’s Cyber Range hubs help narrow talent gap

Driverless autos, trucks and military transport vehicles are on a fast track for wide deployment in the next five years. The good news is that there is some very deep, behind-the-scenes research and development work being done to make driverless vehicles safe and secure enough for public acceptance.

I’m encouraged that this work should produce a halo effect on other smart systems, ultimately making less-critical Internet of Things systems much more secure, as well.

These sentiments settled in upon returning from my recent visit to Detroit, Ann Arbor and Grand Rapids. I was part of a group of journalists escorted on a tour of cybersecurity programs and facilities hosted by the Michigan Economic Development Corp., aka the MEDC.

One of our stops was at a freshly-erected skunk works for auto software research set up in a low-slung warehouse – previously a country western bar – in rural Sparta, on the outskirts of Grand Rapids. The warehouse today is home to Grimm, an Arlington, VA – based cyber research firm that specializes in embedded systems security, and whose claim to fame is doing proprietary projects for U.S. military and intelligence agencies.

Deep testing

Grimm received a $216,000 MEDC grant to set up shop in Sparta and direct its expertise towards discovering security flaws in autonomous vehicle systems under development by Detroit’s big car makers. …more

MY TAKE: Michigan’s cybersecurity readiness initiatives provide roadmap others should follow

By Byron V. Acohido

Michigan is known as the Wolverine State in deference to the ornery quadruped that roams its wild country.

However, after a recent visit to Detroit, Ann Arbor and Grand Rapids as a guest of the Michigan Economic Development Corp., or MEDC, I’m prepared to rechristen Michigan the Cybersecurity Best Practices State.

Related: Michigan moves to close the cybersecurity skills gap. 

This new nickname may not roll off the tongue. But it does fit like a glove. (Michigan’s other nickname, by the way, is the Mitten State, referring to the shape of the larger of its two main peninsulas.)

Cobo Center

I was recently privileged to be part of a group of journalists covering the 2018 North American International Cyber Summit at Detroit’s Cobo Convention Center. My reporting trip included meetings with Michigan-based cybersecurity vendors pursuing leading-edge innovations, as well as a tour of a number of thriving public-private cybersecurity incubator and training programs.

It was the latter that jumped out at me. In an age when cybersecurity intelligence sharing and collaboration is in dire need — but all too short supply —  Michigan has quietly and methodically, stood up some well-thought-out programs that could – if not should – be a model for other states to follow.

I had the chance to meet briefly with two-term Gov. Rick Snyder, who is about to leave office and can point to significant strides Michigan has made ‘reinventing’ its economy under his watch. What’s noteworthy, from my perspective, is that Snyder had the foresight to make cybersecurity readiness a key component of his reinvent Michigan strategy, from day one.

Getting proactive

Snyder says his experience as head of Gateway Computers and as an investor in tech security startups, prior to entering politics, gave him an awareness of why putting Michigan ahead of the curve, dealing with cyber threats, would be vital. …more

Q&A: How certifying in-house IT staffers as cyber analysts, pen testers can boost SMB security

By Byron V. Acohido

A security-first mindset is beginning to seep into the ground floor of the IT departments of small and mid-sized companies across the land.

Senior executives at these SMBs are finally acknowledging that a check-box approach to security isn’t enough, and that instilling a security mindset pervasively throughout their IT departments has become the ground stakes.

Related: The ‘gamification’ of cybersecurity  training

Ransomware, business email compromises and direct ACH system hacks continue to morph and intensify. The exposure faced by SMBs is profound. Cyber intruders skilled at taking the quickest route to digitally exfiltrating the largest amount of cash prey on the weak. No small organization can afford to be lackadaisical.

More and more SMBs have begun dispatching their line IT staff to undergo training and get tested in order to earn basic cybersecurity certifications issued by the Computing Technology Industry Association, aka CompTIA, the non-profit trade association that empowers people to build successful tech careers.

Many companies are taking it a step further, selecting certain techies to also receive advanced training and pursue specialty CompTIA certifications in disciplines such as ethical hacking and penetration testing. Last Watchdog recently sat down with James Stanger, CompTIA’s Chief Technology Evangelist, to discuss how and why SMBs have finally come to see the light. Below are excerpts of our discussion edited for clarity and length:

LW: What are the drivers behind SMBs finally ‘getting’ security?

Stanger: It’s two things. First, companies are more reliant on digital systems than ever before. Frankly, a lot of companies got away with using analogue processes for years, and now they’re finally having to adopt the cloud and the Internet of Things. Secondly, businesses with 10 to 250 people generally have felt for a long time that they weren’t big enough to attack. That’s just not the case anymore. …more

NEW TECH: How ‘adaptive multi-factor authentication’ is gaining traction via partnerships

By Byron V. Acohido

Tel Aviv, Israel-based Silverfort continues to make inroads into proving the efficacy of its innovative approach to multi-factor authentication, or MFA, in corporate settings.

Related: Why a ‘zero-trust’ approach to security is necessary

One recent validation comes from two long established, and much larger cybersecurity vendors – Check Point and Palo Alto Networks – that have recently begun integrating Silverfort’s innovative MFA solution into their respective malware detection and intrusion prevention systems.

Silverfort is the brainchild of a band of colleagues who toiled together in the encryption branch of Unit 8200, the elite cybersecurity arm of the Israeli military.

The co-founders took heed of the limitations companies faced in deploying MFA to protect sensitive systems without unduly hindering productivity. They recognized that rising complexities as business networks underwent digital transformation made MFA cumbersome, and sometimes even impossible, to deploy. …more

MY TAKE: Here’s why we need ‘SecOps’ to help secure ‘Cloud Native’ companiess

By Byron V. Acohido

For many start-ups, DevOps has proven to be a magical formula for increasing business velocity. Speed and agility is the name of the game — especially for Software as a Service (SaaS) companies.

Related: How DevOps enabled the hacking of Uber

DevOps is a process designed to foster intensive collaboration between software developers and the IT operations team, two disciplines that traditionally have functioned as isolated silos with the technology department.

It’s rise in popularity has helped drive a new trend for start-ups to go “Cloud Native,” erecting their entire infrastructure, from the ground up, leveraging cloud services like Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud.

Security burden

Though DevOps-centric organizations can gain altitude quickly, they also tend to generate fresh security vulnerabilities at a rapid clip, as well. Poor configuration of cloud services can translate into gaping vulnerabilities—and low hanging fruit for hackers, the recent Tesla hack being a prime example. In that caper,  a core API was left open allowing them to exploit it and begin using Tesla’s servers to mine cryptocurrency. Rising API exposures are another big security concern, by the way.

Because Amazon, Microsoft and Google provide cloud resources under a “shared responsibility” security model, a large burden rests with the user to be aware of, and mitigate latent security weaknesses.

In fact, it’s much more accurate for organizations tapping into cloud services and utilizing DevOps to think of cloud security as a functioning under …more