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MY TAKE: Massive data breaches persist as agile software development fosters full-stack hacks

By Byron V. Acohido

Data leaks and data theft are part and parcel of digital commerce, even more so in the era of agile software development.

Related: GraphQL APIs stir new exposures

Many of the high-profile breaches making headlines today are the by-product of hackers pounding away at Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) until they find a crease that gets them into the pathways of the data flowing between an individual user and myriad cloud-based resources.

It’s important to understand the nuances of these full-stack attacks if we’re ever to slow them down. I’ve had a few deep discussions about this with Doug Dooley, chief operating officer at Data Theorem, a Palo Alto, Calif.-based software security vendor specializing in API data protection. Here are a few key takeaways:

Targeting low-hanging fruit

Massive data base breaches today generally follow a distinctive pattern: hack into a client -facing application; manipulate an API; follow the data flow to gain access to an overly permissive database or S3 bucket (cloud storage). A classic example of this type of intrusion is the Capital One data breach.

Suspected Capital One hacker Paige Thompson was indicted for her alleged data breach and theft of more than 100 million people including 140,000 social security numbers and 80,000 linked bank accounts. The 33-year-old Amazon Web Services (AWS) software engineer was also accused of stealing cloud computer power on Capital One’s account to “mine” cryptocurrency for her own benefit, a practice known as “cryptojacking.”

Thompson began pounding away on the Capital One’s public-facing applications supposedly protected by their open-source Web Application Firewall (WAF), and succeeded in carrying out a  “Server Side Request Forgery” (SSRF) attack. By successfully hacking the client-facing application, she was then able to relay commands to a legacy AWS metadata service to obtain credentials.

Password and token harvesting is one of the most common techniques in hacking. Using valid credentials, Thompson was able to gain access using APIs … more

GUEST ESSAY: Data poverty is driving the growth of cybercrime – here’s how to reverse the trend

By Robert Panasiuk

Data poverty is real and it’s coming for your user accounts.

Related: Credential stuffing soars due to Covid-19

The current state of data in cybersecurity is a tale of The Haves and The Have-WAY-mores. All tech companies have data, of course, but the only data that’s truly valuable and provides insights—actionable data—isn’t as universal as it should be.

This “data poverty,” or dearth of actionable insights, is a problem for companies across many verticals. Cybersecurity should not be one of them. The sentinels working to prevent the next SolarWinds breach need all the Grade-A data they can get, and fast. Data democratization, on a privacy-compliant basis, is the only way they’ll get it.

The simple truth is that no cybersecurity company can compete with the data stacks of the FAAMG behemoths, which is why cybercrime is seeing a 63 percent boost over the past year.

It’s time to take steps to democratize data and fortunately there are examples of what this looks like in other industries that show how competing security outfits can link arms and still remain competitive.

Why can’t we be friends?

“Coopetition”—competing companies working together and sharing information—is not uncommon across other industries. Casinos trade intel on card counters. E-tailers partner with physical stores to increase their brick-and-mortar presence. Rival software companies exchanging data can involve more red tape, but fundamentally the information they share achieves the same goals: making more money and ensuring their customers receive the best possible service.

GUEST ESSAY: ‘World password day’ reminds us to embrace password security best practices

By Chad Cragle

We celebrated World Password Day on May 6, 2021.

Related: Credential stuffing fuels account takeovers

Did you know that this unconventional celebration got its start in 2013, and that it’s now an official holiday on the annual calendar? Every year, the first Thursday in May serves as a reminder for us to take control of our personal password strategies.

Passwords are now an expected and typical part of our data-driven online lives. In today’s digital culture, it’s not unusual to need a password for everything—from accessing your smartphone, to signing into your remote workspace, to checking your bank statements, and more. We’ve all grown used to entering passwords dozens of times per day, and because of this, we often take passwords for granted and forget how crucial they are.

With that in mind, what steps can you take to ensure that your personal data is protected at all times? As a data-driven, security-focused company, we’ve rounded up our top tips inspired by World Password Day to help you improve your password game.

Password overhaul

We know… just the mere thought of coming up with (and remembering) yet another new password is daunting. The average person has about 100 different passwords for the various tools, apps, websites, and online services they use on a regular basis. With so many passwords to keep track of, those familiar “Update Password” prompts tend to get bothersome.

But, unfortunately, we live in a world of constant hacking attempts and security breaches. While changing passwords may be inconvenient at times, following this password best practice can help prevent the following data catastrophes:

ROUNDTABLE: Experts react to President Biden’s exec order in the aftermath of Colonial Pipeline hack

By Byron V. Acohido

As wake up calls go, the Colonial Pipeline ransomware hack was piercing.

Related: DHS embarks on 60-day cybersecurity sprints

The attackers shut down the largest fuel pipeline in the U.S., compelling Colonial to pay them 75 bitcoins, worth a cool $5 million.

This very high-profile caper is part of an extended surge of ransomware attacks, which  quintupled globally between the first quarter of 2018 and the fourth quarter of 2020, and is expected to rise 20 percent to 40 percent this year,  according to insurance giant Aon.

Ransomware is surging at at time when the global supply chain is being corrupted from inside out, as so vividly illustrated by the SolarWinds supply chain debacle.

In response, President Biden last week issued an executive order requiring more rigorous cybersecurity practices for federal agencies and contractors that develop software for the federal government. Last Watchdog asked a roundtable of cybersecurity industry experts for their reaction. Here’s what they said, responses edited for clarity and length:

Chenxi Wang, founder & general partner, Rain Capital

The new executive order is a swift response from the administration. It’s refreshing to see a government executive order that understands technology trends such as “zero trust”, is able to delineate “Operational Technology (OT)” from “information technology (IT,)” and can talk intelligently about supply chain risks.

While some of the measures stipulated in the order are considered table stakes like multi-factor authentication, the fact that the order exists will help to raise the collective security posture of products and services. It will not be sufficient to defend against sophisticated adversaries, but it will help organizations on the lower end of the capability spectrum to improve their cyber posture and defense.

Keatron Evans, principal security researcher, Infosec Institute

President Biden’s order was drafted with heavy involvement from actual cybersecurity experts, and this is encouraging. Requiring federal agencies to produce an actionable plan to implement Zero Trust Architecture is … more

RSAC insights: Deploying SOAR, XDR along with better threat intel stiffens network defense

By Byron V. Acohido

Much attention has been paid to the widespread failure to detect the insidious Sunburst malware that the SolarWinds hackers managed to slip deep inside the best-defended networks on the planet.

Related: The undermining of the global supply chain

But there’s also an encouraging ‘response’ lesson SolarWinds teaches us, as well.

Reacting to the disclosure of this momentous supply-chain hack, many of the breached organizations were able to deploy advanced tools and tactics to swiftly root out Sunburst and get better prepared to repel any copycat attacks. It was an opportunity to put their security orchestration and automation and response (SOAR) solutions, as well as endpoint detection and response (EDR) tools, to the test.

In that sense, SolarWinds validated the truckloads of investment that has been poured into developing and deploying SOAR and EDR innovations over the past five years. I had the chance recently to visit with Leon Ward, Vice President of Product Management, at ThreatQuotient, provider of a security operations platform with multiple use cases including serving as a threat intelligence platform (TIP). We discussed current developments that suggest SOAR and EDR will continue to improve and make a difference.

For a full drill down on our conversation, please give the accompanying podcast a listen. Here are my key takeaways:

Leveraging richer intel

It was by happenstance that analysts at FireEye, a leading supplier of intrusion detection systems, stumbled into a copy of the Sunburst Trojan ever-so-stealthily embedded in FireEye’s own copy of SolarWinds’ Orion network management software. That was on Dec. 13, 2020.

RSAC insights: Sophos report dissects how improved tools, tactics stop ransomware attack

By Byron V. Acohido

A new report from Sophos dissects how hackers spent two weeks roaming far-and-wide through the modern network of a large enterprise getting into a prime position to carry out what could’ve been a devasting ransomware attack.

Related: DHS embarks on 60-day cybersecurity sprints

This detailed intelligence about a ProxyLogon-enabled attack highlights how criminal intruders are blending automation and human programming skills to great effect. However, in this case, at least, they were detected and purged before hitting paydirt, demonstrating something that doesn’t get discussed often enough.

Enterprises actually have access to plenty of robust security technology, as well as proven tactics and procedures, to detect and defuse even leading-edge, multi-layered attacks. It’s clear to me that cybersecurity technical innovation and supporting frameworks, which includes wider threat intelligence sharing, are taking hold and making a material difference, albeit incrementally.

I had a lively discussion with Dan Schiappa, Sophos’ chief product officer, about this. For a drill down, please give the accompanying podcast a listen. Here are the key takeaways:

Exploit surge

ProxyLogon refers to the critical vulnerability discovered in Microsoft Exchange mail servers early this year. Criminal hacking rings have been hammering away at this latest of a long line of zero-day flaws discovered in a globally distributed system. The pattern is all too familiar: they marshal their hacking infrastructure to take advantage of the window of time when there is a maximum number of vulnerable systems just begging to be hacked.

RSAC insights: CyberGRX finds a ton of value in wider sharing of third-party risk assessments

By Byron V. Acohido

The value of sharing threat intelligence is obvious. It’s much easier to blunt the attack of an enemy you can clearly see coming at you.

Related: Supply chains under siege.

But what about trusted allies who unwittingly put your company in harm’s way? Third-party exposures can lead to devastating breaches, just ask any Solar Winds first-party customer.

So could sharing intelligence about third-party suppliers help?

With RSA Conference 2021 technical sessions getting underway today, I sat down with Fred Kneip, CEO of CyberGRX, to hash over the notion that a lot of good could come from more systematic sharing of the risk profiles that large enterprises routinely compile with respect to their third-party contractors.

For a full drill down on our discussion, please give the accompanying podcast a listen. Here are the key takeaways:

The genesis of risk-profiles

It turns out there is a ton of third-party risk profiles sitting around not being put to any kind of high use. Back in the mid-1990s, big banks and insurance companies came up with something called “bespoke assessments” as the approach for assessing third party vendor risk.

This took the form of programmatic audits. In order to get the blessing of financiers and insurers, enterprises had to set up systems to get their third-party suppliers to fill out extensive risk-profile questionnaires; and this  cumbersome process had to be repeated on a periodic base for as many contractors as they could get to.

CyberGRX launched in 2016 as a clearinghouse for companies to pool and share standardized assessment data and actually analyze the results for action. The idea was to benefit both the first-party contractors and the third-party suppliers, Kneip says. Thus, the Fortune 1,000 companies who collected and consumed the security profiles of major suppliers could see and analyze that data in aggregate and thus conduct a much higher level of risk analysis.