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MY TAKE: What if Big Data and AI could be intensively focused on health and wellbeing?

By Byron V. Acohido

Might it be possible to direct cool digital services at holistically improving the wellbeing of each citizen of planet Earth?

Related: Pursuing a biological digital twin

A movement aspiring to do just that is underway — and it’s not being led by a covey of tech-savvy Tibetan monks. This push is coming from the corporate sector.

Last August, NTT, the Tokyo-based technology giant, unveiled its Health and Wellbeing initiative – an ambitious effort to guide corporate, political and community leaders onto a more enlightened path. NTT, in short, has set out to usher in a new era of human wellness.

Towards this end it has begun sharing videos, whitepapers and reports designed to rally decision makers from all quarters to a common cause. The blue-sky mission is to bring modern data mining and machine learning technologies to bear delivering personalized services that ameliorate not just physical ailments, but also mental and even emotional ones.

That’s a sizable fish to fry. I had a lively discussion with Craig Hinkley, CEO of NTT Application Security, about the thinking behind this crusade. I came away encouraged that some smart folks are striving to pull us in a well-considered direction. For a full drill down, please give the accompanying podcast a listen. Here are a few key takeaways:

A new starting point

Modern medicine has advanced leaps and bounds in my lifetime when it comes to diagnosing and treating severe illnesses. Even so, for a variety of reasons, healthcare sectors in the U.S. and other jurisdictions have abjectly failed over the past 20 years leveraging Big Data to innovate personalized healthcare services.

NEW TECH: How a ‘bio digital twin’ that helps stop fatal heart attacks could revolutionize medicine

By Byron V. Acohido

Without much fanfare, digital twins have established themselves as key cogs of modern technology.

Related: Leveraging the full potential of data lakes.

A digital twin is a virtual duplicate of a physical entity or a process — created by extrapolating data collected from live settings. Digital twins enable simulations to be run without risking harm to the physical entity; they help inform efficiency gains made in factories and assure the reliability of jet engines, for instance.

As data collection and computer modeling have advanced apace, so have the use-cases for digital twin technology. And as part of this trend, development is now underway to someday bring “biological” digital twins into service.

This is very exciting stuff. It signals the leading edge of digital advances. In our immediate future are digital platforms capable of doing much more than deploying driverless vehicles or enabling joy rides into space. A day is coming when bio digital twins could help to prevent the onset of debilitating diseases and promote wellness.

NTT Research is in the thick of this budding revolution. A division of Japanese telecom giant NTT Group, NTT Research opened its doors in July 2019, assembling the best-and-brightest scientists and researchers to push the edge of the envelope in quantum physics, medical informatics and cryptography.

I had the chance to sit down with Dr. Joe Alexander and Dr. Jon Peterson who are heading up NTT Research’s effort to develop the computational models that would make possible a bio digital twin for the human heart. For a full drill down of our conversation, please give the accompanying podcast a listen. Here are a few key takeaways:

SHARED INTEL: Reviving ‘observability’ as a means to deeply monitor complex modern networks

By Byron V. Acohido

An array of promising security trends is in motion.

New frameworks, like SASE, CWPP and CSPM, seek to weave security more robustly into the highly dynamic, intensely complex architecture of modern business networks.

Related: 5 Top SIEM myths

And a slew of new application security technologies designed specifically to infuse security deeply into specific software components – as new coding is being developed and even after it gets deployed and begins running in live use.

Now comes another security initiative worth noting. A broad push is underway to retool an old-school software monitoring technique, called observability, and bring it to bear on modern business networks. I had the chance to sit down with George Gerchow, chief security officer at Sumo Logic, to get into the weeds on this.

Based in Redwood City, Calif., Sumo Logic supplies advanced cloud monitoring services and is in the thick of this drive to adapt classic observability to the convoluted needs of company networks, today and going forward. For a drill down on this lively discussion, please give the accompanying podcast a listen. Here are the main takeaways:

Black Hat insights: How to shift security-by-design to the right, instead of left, with SBOM, deep audits

By Byron V. Acohido

There is a well-established business practice referred to as bill of materials, or BOM, that is a big reason why we can trust that a can of soup isn’t toxic or that the jetliner we’re about to board won’t fail catastrophically

Related: Experts react to Biden cybersecurity executive order

A bill of materials is a complete list of the components used to manufacture a product. The software industry has something called SBOM: software bill of materials. However, SBOMs are rudimentary when compared to the BOMs associated with manufacturing just about everything else we expect to be safe and secure: food, buildings, medical equipment, medicines and transportation vehicles.

An effort to bring SBOMs up to par is gaining steam and getting a lot of attention at Black Hat USA 2021 this week in Las Vegas. President Biden’s cybersecurity executive order, issued in May, includes a detailed SBOM requirement for all software delivered to the federal government.

ReversingLabs, a Cambridge, MA-based software vendor that helps companies conduct deep analysis of new apps just before they go out the door, is in the thick of this development. I had the chance to visit with its co-founder and chief software architect Tomislav Pericin. For a full drill down on our discussion please give the accompanying podcast a listen. Here are the big takeaways:

Gordian Knot challenge

The software industry is fully cognizant of the core value of a bill of materials and has been striving for a number of years to adapt it to software development.

Black Hat insights: WAFs are getting much more dynamic making them well-suited to protect SMBs

By Byron V. Acohido

A cornucopia of cybersecurity solutions went on public display today as Black Hat USA 2021 convened once more as a live event in Las Vegas.

Related: Kaseya hack raises more supply chain worries

For small- and mid-sized businesses (SMBs) cutting through the marketing hype can be daunting. That said, there is one venerable technology – web application firewalls (WAFs) – that is emerging as a perfect fit for SMBs in today’s environment, as all companies shift to a deeper reliance on cloud services and mobile apps.

I had the chance to get into the weeds of this trend with Venky Sundar, co-founder and chief marketing officer of Indusface, a Bengalura, India-based supplier of  cloud-hosted WAF services (Indusface has numerous enterprise deployments and also offers the same protections, cost-effectively, to SMBs.)

For a full drill down on our discussion, please give the accompanying podcast a listen. Here are the big takeaways:

WAF resurgence

Web apps and mobile apps are where they action is. SMBs must continually come up with cool new apps to stay competitive; it’s no surprise that this is also where threat actors are focusing their attention.

Criminal hacking rings are carrying out big sweeps, 24X7, hunting for well-known application vulnerabilities that they can manipulate to breach company networks. WAFs help companies keep track of these malicious probes by scanning incoming HTTPS traffic and taking note of parameters such as IP address, port routing, cookie data and incoming data.

The knock on WAFs for many years has been that while they are excellent at parsing HTTPS traffic, all too many companies choose not to instruct their WAFs to actually block any traffic that might be malicious.

Black Hat insights: The retooling of SOAR to fit as the automation core protecting evolving networks

By Byron V. Acohido

In less than a decade, SOAR — security orchestration, automation and response — has rapidly matured into an engrained component of the security technology stack in many enterprises.

Related: Equipping SOCs for the long haul

SOAR has done much since it entered the cybersecurity lexicon to relieve the cybersecurity skills shortage. SOAR leverages automation and machine learning to correlate telemetry flooding in from multiple security systems. This dramatically reduces the manual labor required to do a first-level sifting of the data inundating modern business networks

However, SOAR has potential to do so much more, observes Cody Cornell, chief strategy officer and co-founder of Swimlane. SOAR, he argues, is in a position to arise as a tool that can help companies make the pivot to high-reliance on cloud-centric IT infrastructure. At the moment, a lot of organizations are in this boat.

“Covid 19 turned out to be the best digital transformation initiative ever,” Cornell says. “It forced us to do things that probably would’ve taken many more years for us to do, in terms of adopting to remote work and transitioning to cloud services.”

Swimlane, which launched in 2014 and is based in Denver, finds itself in the vanguard of cybersecurity vendors hustling to retool not just SOAR, but also security operations centers (SOCs,) security information and event management (SIEM) systems, and endpoint detection and response (EDR) tools. A core theme at RSA 2021 earlier this year – and at Black Hat USA 2021, taking place this week in Las Vegas – is that the combining of these and other security systems is inevitable and will end up resulting in something greater than the parts, i.e. not just more efficacious security, but optimized business networks overall.

Black Hat insights: Will Axis Security’s ZTNA solution hasten the sunsetting of VPNs, RDP?

By Byron V. Acohido

Company-supplied virtual private networks (VPNs) leave much to be desired, from a security standpoint.

Related: How ‘SASE’ is disrupting cloud security

This has long been the case. Then a global pandemic came along and laid bare just how brittle company VPNs truly are.

Criminal hackers recognized the golden opportunity presented by hundreds of millions employees suddenly using a company VPN to work from home and remotely connect to an array of business apps. Two sweeping trends resulted:  one bad, one good.

First, bad actors instantly began to hammer away at company VPNs; and attacks against instances of Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) spiked dramatically, as well. VPNs and RDP both enable remote access that can put an intruder deep inside the firewall. And attempts to break into them have risen exponential over the past 17 months.

Conversely, Zero Trust has gained some material traction. As Black Hat USA 2021 convenes in Las Vegas this week, consensus is quickening around the wisdom of sunsetting legacy remote access tools, like VPNs and RDP, and replacing them with systems based on Zero Trust, i.e. trust no one, principles.

One start-up, Axis Security, couldn’t be more in the thick of these trends. Based in San Mateo, CA, Axis publicly announced its advanced Zero Trust access tool in March 2020, just as the global economy was slowing to a crawl.

“We came out of stealth mode right at the beginning of all the big shutdowns, and we got a number of customers, pretty fast, who were looking for solutions to remotely connect users to systems,” says Deena Thomchick, vice president of product marketing at Axis. “These were users who never had remote access before.”