Home Podcasts Videos Guest Posts Q&A My Take Bio Contact
 

My Take

 

MY TAKE: Why COVID-19 ‘digital distancing’ is every bit as vital as ‘social distancing’

By Byron V. Acohido

As coronavirus-themed cyber attacks ramp up, consumers and companies must practice digital distancing to keep themselves protected.

Related: Coronavirus scams leverage email

As we get deeper into dealing with the coronavirus outbreak, the need for authorities and experts to communicate reliably and effectively with each other, as well as to the general public, is vital.

That, of course, presents the perfect environment for cybercrime that pivots off social engineering. Sadly, coronavirus phishing and ransomware hacks already are in high gear.

“There’s a special ring of hell reserved for those who take advantage of a public health crisis to make money,” says Adam Levin, founder and chairman of CyberScout, a Scottsdale, AZ-based  supplier of identity and data theft recovery services. I agree wholeheartedly with Levin on this, as I imagine most folks would.

Social engineering invariably is the first step in cyber attacks ranging from phishing and ransomware to business email compromise (BEC) scams and advanced persistent threat (APT) hacks.

“While this kind of fraud is the new normal, often fine-tuned for specific holidays and big news stories, a global health disaster creates an even more fertile field than usual for fraudsters,” Levin observes.

MY TAKE: ‘Network Detection and Response’ emerges as an Internet of Things security stopgap

By Byron V. Acohido

There’s no stopping the Internet of Things now.

Related: The promise, pitfalls of IoT

Companies have commenced the dispersal of IoT systems far and wide. Data collected by IoT devices will increasingly get ingested into cloud-centric networks where it will get crunched by virtual servers. And fantastic new IoT-enabled services will spew out of the other end.

The many privacy and security issues raised by IoT, however, are another story. The addressing of IoT privacy and security concerns lags far, far behind. Commendably, the global cybersecurity community continues to push companies to practice cyber hygiene. And industry groups and government regulators are stepping up efforts to incentivize IoT device makers to embed security at the device level.

Very clearly, something more is needed. That’s where a cottage industry of security companies in the Network Detection and Response (NDR) space comes into play. NDR vendors champion the notion that it’s a good idea for someone to be keeping an eagle eye on the rivers of packets that crisscross modern enterprise networks, especially packets flooding in from IoT systems. That can be done very efficiently today, and would markedly improve network security without waiting for better security practices or tougher industry standards to take hold, they argue.

I had a fascinating discussion about this with Sri Sundaralingam, vice president of cloud and security solutions at ExtraHop, a Seattle-based supplier of NDR technologies. We spoke at RSA 2020. For a full drill down on our conversation, give the accompanying podcast a listen. Here are the key takeaways:

IoT surge

According to Fortune Business Insights, the global IoT market will top $1.1 trillion by 2026, up from $190 billion in 2018. That’s a compounded annual growth rate of a whopping 24.7 percent.

MY TAKE: Deploying ‘machine learning’ at router level helps companies prepare for rise of 5G

By Byron V. Acohido

Machine learning (ML) and digital transformation (DX) go hand in glove.

We’ve mastered how to feed data into pattern-recognition algorithms. And as we accelerate the digitalization of everything, even more data is being generated.

Related: Defending networks with no perimeter

Machine learning already is deeply embedded in the online shopping, banking, entertainment and social media systems we’ve come to rely on. Meanwhile, criminal hacking groups increasingly leverage ML  to pillage those very same online systems.

At RSA 2020, I was encouraged by strong evidence that the cybersecurity industry has now jumped fully on board the ML bandwagon. Juniper Networks, known for its high-performance routers, is in the vanguard of established technology and cybersecurity vendors applying ML and automation to defend company networks.

I had the chance to sit down with Laurence Pitt, Juniper’s global security strategy director. We had a lively discussion about the surge of fresh data about to hit as 5G interconnectedness gains traction — and how this will surely result in a spike in fresh vulnerabilities. For a full drill down please give the accompanying podcast a listen. A few key takeaways:

Trust factor

This is an exciting time in the world of network security, with the growth of 5G pushing industries into a world where virtually anything can be connected. The proliferation of connected devices means that anything with a vulnerability can become an attack vector for the network, however, and it requires massive resources to manage all these systems and identify possible threats.

SHARED INTEL: FireMon survey shows security lags behind fast pace of hybrid cloud deployments

By Byron V. Acohido

Corporate America’s love affair with cloud computing has hit a feverish pitch. Yet ignorance persists when it comes to a momentous challenge at hand: how to go about tapping the benefits of digital transformation while also keeping cyber exposures to a minimum level.

Related: Why some CEOs have quit tweeting

That’s the upshot of FireMon’s second annual State of Hybrid Cloud Security Report of 522 IT and security professionals, some 14 percent of whom occupy C-suite positions.

Nearly 60 percent of the respondents indicated the pace of their cloud deployments have surpassed their ability to secure them in a timely manner. Notably, that’s essentially the same response FireMon got when it posed this same question in its inaugural hybrid cloud survey some 14 months ago.

That’s not a good thing, given migration to cloud-based business systems, reliance on mobile devices and onboarding of IoT systems are all on an upward sweep. “It doesn’t seem like we’ve moved the needle on security at all,” says Tim Woods, vice president of technology alliances at FireMon, the leading provider of automated network security policy management systems.

I had the chance to visit with Woods at RSAC 2020 in San Francisco recently. For a full drill down on our discussion, please give a listen to the accompanying podcast. Here’s a summary of key takeaways:

Shared burden confusion

Hybrid cloud refers to the mixing and matching of on-premise IT systems, aka private clouds, with processing power, data storage, and collaboration tools leased from public cloud services, such as Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud. Hybrid clouds are being leveraged to refresh legacy networks, boost productivity and innovate new software services at breakneck speed, to keep pace with rivals.

SHARED INTEL: Bogus Coronavirus email alerts underscore risk posed by weaponized email

By Byron V. Acohido

It comes as no surprise that top cyber crime rings immediately pounced on the Coronavirus outbreak to spread a potent strain of malware via malicious email and web links.

Related: Credential stuffing fuels cyber fraud

IBM X-Force researchers shared details about how emails aimed at Japanese-speaking individuals have been widely dispersed purporting to share advice on infection-prevention measures for the disease. One of the waves of weaponized emails actually is designed to spread a digital virus: the notorious Emotet banking Trojan designed to steal sensitive information.

One cybersecurity company, Tel Aviv-based Votiro, is taking a different approach to strengthen protection against such weaponized documents, using technology that disarms files before they are delivered to the recipient’s inbox.   I had the chance to visit with Votiro CEO and founder Aviv Grafi at RSA 2020. For a full drill down give a listen to the accompanying podcast. Here are a few key takeaways:

Filtering falls short

As a former penetration tester who specialized in testing employees aptitude for resisting email lures, Grafi saw time-and-again how – and why – attackers leverage timely events, such as celebrity deaths, holidays or tax deadlines to lure email recipients to click on corrupted Word docs or PDF attachments.

Votiro introduced their ‘Disarmer’ technology, called CDR, for “content, disarm and reconstruction” to the U.S. market in 2019. CDR takes a prevention, instead of detection, approach to disarming weaponized email and deterring document-delivered malware.

MY TAKE: Why speedy innovation requires much improved cyber hygiene, cloud security

By Byron V. Acohido

Speed is what digital transformation is all about. Organizations are increasingly outsourcing IT workloads to cloud service providers and looking to leverage IoT systems.

Related: The API attack vector expands

Speed translates into innovation agility. But it also results in endless ripe attack vectors which threat actors swiftly seek out and exploit. A big challenge security executives face is balancing speed vs. security.

I spoke with Greg Young, Cybersecurity Vice President at Trend Micro about this. We met at RSA 2020 in San Francisco. Trend Micro has evolved from one of the earliest suppliers of antivirus suites to a provider of a broad platform of systems to help individuals and organizations reduce cyber exposures.

For a full drill down of our discussion, please give the accompanying podcast a listen. Here are a few key takeaways.

Teeming threat landscape

Security leaders’ key priority is reducing exposures to the cyber risks they know are multiplying. Compliance penalties, lawsuits, loss of intellectual property, theft of customer personal data, and reputational damage caused by poor cyber defenses are now top operational concerns. Yet many organizations continue to practice poor cyber hygiene.

Cyber hygiene basics revolve around aligning people, processes and technologies to adopt a security-first mindset. In the current environment, it is vitally important for companies to secure vulnerabilities in their mission-critical systems, while at the same time remaining vigilant about detecting intruders and recovering quickly from inevitable breaches.

SHARED INTEL: Survey shows some CEOs have quit Tweeting, here’s why they were smart to do so

By Byron V. Acohido

Cyber threats now command the corporate sector’s full attention. It’s reached the point where some CEOs have even begun adjusting their personal online habits to help protect themselves, and by extension, the organizations they lead. Corporate consultancy PwC’s recent poll of 1,600 CEOs worldwide found that cyber attacks are now considered the top hinderance to corporate performance, followed by the shortage of skilled workers and the inability to keep up with rapid tech advances.

Related: How ‘credential stuffing’ enables online fraud

As a result, some CEOs admit they’ve stopped Tweeting and deleted their LinkedIn and other social media accounts – anything to help reduce their organization’s exposure to cyber criminals. “Senior C-level executives and board members are paying more attention now to cybersecurity than two years ago, by far,” observes Jeff Pollard, vice president and principal analyst at tech research firm Forrester.

Awareness is a vital step forward, no doubt. But it’s only a baby step. Corporate inertia still looms large. For many Chief Information Security Officers, having the CEO’s ear, at the moment, is proving to be a double-edged sword, Pollard told me. “We find many CISOs spend their time explaining what threats matter and why, as opposed to why cybersecurity matters in the first place,” he says. “Security leaders must also find ways to explain why budgets that have steadily increased, year after year, have not solved the security problems”.