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GUEST ESSAY. Everyone should grasp these facts about cyber threats that plague digital commerce

By Ashley Lukehart

Regardless of how familiar you are with Information Security, you’ve probably come across the term ‘malware’ countless times. From accessing your business-critical resources and sensitive information to halting business operations and services, a malware infection can quickly become an organization’s worst nightmare come true.

Related: Companies must bear a broad security burden.

As a business owner, you must be aware of the implications of different types of malware on your company’s bottom line, and what steps you can take to protect your company from future attacks.

This article will walk you through the various types of malware, how to identify and prevent a malware attack, and how to mitigate the risks.

What is Malware  

Malware, a combination of the terms ‘malicious’ and ‘software,’ includes all malicious programs that intend to exploit computer devices or entire network infrastructures to extract victim’s data, disrupt business operations, or simply, cause chaos.

There’s no definitive method or technique that defines malware; any program that harms the computer or system owners and benefits the perpetrators is malware.

GUEST ESSAY: Now more than ever, companies need to proactively promote family Online Safety

By Ellen Sabin

Cybersecurity training has steadily gained traction in corporate settings over the past decade, and rightfully so.

In response to continuing waves of data breaches and network disruptions, companies have made a concerted effort and poured substantial resources into promoting data security awareness among employees, suppliers and clients. Safeguarding data in workplace settings gets plenty of attention.

Related: Mock attack help schools prepare for hackers

However, the sudden and drastic shift to work-from-home and schooling-from-home settings has changed the ball game. The line between personal and professional use of digital tools and services, which was blurry even before the global pandemic, has now been obliterated by Covid-19.

Moving forward, companies can no longer afford to focus awareness training on just employees, partners and clients. It has become strategically important for them to promote best security practices in home settings, including the training of children.

Bringing smart habits into homes and minds is good for kids, good for parents, and, it turns out, good for businesses, too.

We’re all connected

Consider that kids are constantly connected on the internet with online games, streaming devices, virtual schooling, and zoom play dates. Adults increasingly are working from home, and usually on networks they share with their children. Mistakes online by one family member can lead to compromises in a household’s network, placing computers, personal data, and perhaps even work-related content at risk.

Cyber criminals have increased attacks as they see these opportunities. Companies must take this into account and consider extending employee training to also promote security and privacy habits among all family

GUEST ESSAY: HIPAA’s new ‘Safe Harbor’ rules promote security at healthcare firms under seige

By Riyan N. Alam

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act — HIPAA — has undergone some massive changes in the past few years to minimize the burden of healthcare entities.

Related: Hackers relentless target healthcare providers

Despite these efforts, covered-entities and business associates continue to find HIPAA to be overwhelming and extensive, to say the least.

Cyberattacks against healthcare entities rose 45 percent between November 2020 and January 2021, according to Check Point . Meanwhile, the healthcare sector accounted for 79 percent of all reported data breaches during the first 10 months of 2020, a study by Fortified Health Security tells us.

At last, some good news has surfaced that encourages healthcare providers to implement the best security practices and meet HIPAA requirements. Amidst all of the turmoil, President Donald Trump officially signed H.R. 7898, known as the HIPAA Safe Harbor Bill, into law on January 5, 2021.

It is a new sign of relief for entities that could do very little against unavoidable and highly sophisticated cyberattacks. This bill is one of many recent industry efforts aimed at improving cybersecurity. The legislation amends the HITECH Act to require the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to reward organizations that follow the best cybersecurity practices for meeting HIPAA requirements.

GUEST ESSAY: 5 steps for raising cyber smart children — who know how to guard their privacy

By Ellen Sabin

Today’s children are online at a young age, for many hours, and in more ways than ever before. As adults, we know that bad online decisions can have negative or dangerous effects for years to come.

Related: Web apps are being used to radicalize youth

The question isn’t whether we should educate children about online safety, but how we can best inspire them to learn to be thoughtful, careful, and safe in the cyber world for their lifetime. For adults doing the teaching, it’s no easy task.

Teaching children about good cyber security habits starts with helping them realize their power to learn to make smart choices. Often, messages about online security are presented as ‘to-do’ lists that can make even the most pliant of us feel like we are being preached to. Instead, let children think about why they want to become smart about online decisions and how they can make good choices.

Here are some tips to excite kids about cybersecurity.

GUEST ESSAY: Here’s how Secure Access Service Edge — ‘SASE’ — can help, post Covid-19

By Liraz Postan

One legacy of the ongoing global pandemic is that companies now realize that a secured and well-supported remote workforce is possible. Recently, the University of Illinois and the Harvard Business School conducted a study, and 16% of companies reported switching their employees to work at home from offices at least twice a week.

Related: SASE translates into secure connectivity

The problem here is that a secured, cost-effective, and efficient networkmust be developed to support remote operations at scale.  Gartner refers to this as the Secure Access Service Edge (SASE), which is a framework combining the functionality of Wide Area Network (WAN) with network security services to shield against any cyber threats or cloud-enabled SaaS.

The makeup of SASE 

Many enterprises have accelerated their use of Virtual Private Network (VPN) solutions to support remote workers during this pandemic.

However deploying VPNs on a wide-scale basis introduces performance and scalability issues. SASE can function as security infrastructure and as the core IT network of large enterprises. It incorporates zero-trust technologies and software-defined wide area networking (SD-WAN). SASE then provides secure connectivity between the cloud and users, much as with a VPN. But it much further. It can also deploy web filtering, threat prevention, DNS security, sandboxing, data loss prevention, next-generation firewall policies, information security and credential theft prevention. 

Thus SASE combines advanced threat protection and secure access with enterprise-class data loss prevention. Given the climbing rate of remote workers, SASE has shifted from being a developing solution to being very timely, sophisticated response to leading-edge cyber attacks. Here are a few  guidelines to follow when looking for vendors pitching SASE services:.

GUEST ESSAY: ‘CyberXchange’ presents a much-needed platform for cybersecurity purchases

By Armistead Whitney

There is no shortage of innovative cybersecurity tools and services that can help companies do a much better job of defending their networks.

Related: Welcome to the CyberXchange Marketplace

In the U.S. alone, in fact, there are more than 5,000 cybersecurity vendors. For organizations looking to improve their security posture, this is causing confusion and vendor fatigue, especially for companies that don’t have a full time Chief Information Security Officer.

The vendors are well-intentioned. They are responding to a trend of companies moving to meet rising compliance requirements, such as PCI-DSS and GDPR. Senior management is now  focused on embracing well-vetted best practices such as those outlined in FFIEC and SOC 2, and many more. According to a recent study by PwC, 91% of all companies are following cybersecurity frameworks, like these, as they build and implement their cybersecurity programs.

All of this activity has put a strain on how companies buy and sell cybersecurity solutions. Consider that PCI-DSS alone has over 250 complex requirements that include things like endpoint protection, password management, anti-virus, border security, data recovery and awareness training.

Traditional channels for choosing the right security solutions are proving to be increasingly ineffective. This includes searching through hundreds of companies on Google, attending trade shows and conferences (not possible today with COVID), or dealing with constant cold calls and cold emails from security company sales reps.

GUEST ESSAY: Skeptical about buying life insurance online? Here’s how to do it — securely

By Cynthia Madison

Purchasing life insurance once meant going to an insurer’s office or booking an appointment with an insurance agent. Then, in most cases, you’d have to undergo a medical examination and wait a few weeks to get approved and complete the whole process. But this scenario doesn’t seem to fit the fast-paced world we live in anymore. Today’s generation is used to getting everything done fast and easy, so life insurance providers had to get with the times and cover all customers’ needs and requirements.

Related: Life insurance types explained

From shopping to socializing or paying their bills, people seem to be doing everything online these days, so it was only a matter of time until insurance companies stepped into the digital world. Now everyone has the possibility to purchase life insurance from the comfort of their home by simply going online and looking for the policies that will fit their needs. Even major life insurance companies have stepped up their game and now provide a variety of online resources to cater to all consumers.

But with all the convenience also came concern. Some are still reluctant to purchase life insurance online for safety reasons and because they’re still unfamiliar with the steps they should follow. When you search for life insurance online, you’re on your own, with no one to guide you through the process, so how can you be sure you won’t make any costly mistakes? Here we’re going to tackle these issues and more to help you make an informed decision if you decide to buy life insurance online.

The pros

Apart from providing a hassle-free process, there are other notable advantages to buying life insurance online. For one, online platforms give you the possibility to compare insurance options from different providers, something that’s not possible if you go the traditional route. Different companies will offer different prices for the same type of policy, so you’ll have to … more