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News alert: Kiteworks named as a founding member of NIST’s new AI safety consortium – ‘AISIC’

San Mateo, Calif., Feb. 13, 2023 – The U.S. White House announced groundbreaking collaboration between OpenPolicy and leading innovation companies, including Kiteworks, which delivers data privacy and compliance for sensitive content communications through its Private Content Network.

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Artificial Intelligence Safety Institute Consortium (AISIC) will act as a collaborative platform where both public sector and private sector leading organizations will provide guidance on standards and methods in the development of trustworthy AI.

The Kiteworks platform provides customers with a Private Content Network that enables them to employ zero-trust policy management in the governance and protection of sensitive content communications, including the ingestion of sensitive content into generative AI (GenAI).

Kiteworks unifies, tracks, controls, and secures sensitive content moving within, into, and out of organizations. With Kiteworks, organizations can significantly improve risk management and ensure regulatory compliance on all sensitive content communications.

Author Q&A: The ongoing role of fortified structures in military clashes — and cybersecurity

By Byron V. Acohido

There’s no denying that castle walls play a prominent role in the histories of both military defense, going back thousands of years, and — as of the start of the current millennia — in cybersecurity.

Related: How Putin has weaponized ransomware

In his new Polity Press book, The Guarded Age, Fortification in the Twenty-First Century, David J. Betz, delves into historic nuances, on the military side, and posits important questions about the implications for cybersecurity, indeed, for civilization, going forward.

Betz is Professor of War in the Modern World at Kings College London. I asked him about how and why certain fundamental components of ancient, fortified structures have endured. Below are highlights of our discussion, edited for clarity and length.

LW: You cite many examples of instant castle walls, if you will, getting erected in current-day war zones. How can this be, given modern warfare tactics and smart weaponry?

GUEST ESSAY: Leveraging real-time visibility to quell persistent ‘take-a-USB-stick-home’ attacks

By Ben Smith

Each of us has probably sat through some level of cybersecurity awareness training during our professional lives.

Related: Dangers of spoofed QR codes

Stop and think before you click on a link within an email from an unexpected source. Don’t re-use a password across multiple sites. Beware over-sharing personal information online, especially on social media platforms. All good advice!

When we sit back and think about the target audience for this training, much of this advice is designed to reach the busy or distracted employee who postpones laptop software updates or who copies sensitive or who copies proprietary information to a USB stick and takes it home.

DEEP TECH NEWS: Respecting individual rights by using ‘privacy preserving aggregate statistics’

By Byron V. Acohido

To sell us more goods and services, the algorithms of Google, Facebook and Amazon exhaustively parse our digital footprints.

Related: The role of ‘attribute based encryption’

There’s nothing intrinsically wrong with companies seeking to better understand their customers. However, over the past 20 years the practice of analyzing user data hasn’t advanced much beyond serving the business models of these tech giants.

That could be about to change. Scientists at NTT Research are working on an advanced type of cryptography that enables businesses to perform aggregate data analysis on user data — without infringing upon individual privacy rights.

I had the chance to visit with , senior scientist at NTT Research’s Cryptography & Information Security (CIS) Lab, to learn more about the progress being made on a promising concept called “privacy preserving aggregate statistics.”

MY TAKE: Rising geopolitical tensions suggest a dire need for tighter cybersecurity in 2024

By Byron V. Acohido

Russia’s asymmetrical cyber-attacks have been a well-documented, rising global concern for most of the 2000s.

Related: Cybersecurity takeaways of 2023

I recently visited with Mihoko Matsubara, Chief Cybersecurity Strategist at NTT to discuss why this worry has climbed steadily over the past few years – and is likely to intensify in 2024.

The wider context is all too easy to overlook. Infamous cyber opsattributed to Russia-backed hackers fall into a pattern that’s worth noting:

Cyber attacks on Estonia (2007) Websites of Estonian banks, media outlets and government bodies get knocked down in a dispute over a Soviet-era war memorial.

Cyber attacks on Georgia (2008, 2019) Georgian government websites get defaced; thousands of

STEPS FORWARD: How decentralizing IoT could help save the planet — by driving decarbonization

By Byron V. Acohido

The Internet of Things (IoT) is on the threshold of ascending to become the Internet of Everything (IoE.)

Related:Why tech standards matter

IoT is transitioning from an array of devices that we can control across the Internet into a realm where billions of IoE devices can communicate with each other and make unilateral decisions on our behalf.

This, of course, is the plot of endless dystopian books and movies that end with rogue machines in charge. Yet IoE, at this nascent stage, holds much promise to tilt us towards a utopia where technology helps to resolve our planet’s most intractable problems.

This was the theme of Infineon Technologies’ OktoberTech 2023 conference, which I had the privilege of attending at the Computer History Museum in the heart of Silicon Valley. I had the chance to visit with Thomas Rosteck, Infineon’s Division President of Connected Secure Systems (CSS.)

Infineon supplies semiconductors embedded in smart systems, most notably in automotive, power and IoT. What I found most commendable

STEPS FORWARD: New tech standards, like ‘Matter’ and ‘BIMI,’ point the way to secure interoperability

By Byron V. Acohido

The IQ of our smart homes is about to level-up.

Hundreds of different types of smart devices designed to automate tasks and route control to our smart phones and wearable devices have arrived on store shelves, just in time for the holiday shopping season.

Related: Extending digital trust globally

Some of these latest, greatest digital wonders will function well together, thanks to the new Matter smart home devices standard, which was introduced one year ago.

However, there’s still a long way to go to achieve deep interoperability of interconnected services in a way that preserves privacy and is very secure. Matter is a bellwether, part of a fresh slate of technical standards and protocols taking shape that will help to ingrain digital trust and pave the way for massively-interconnected, highly-interoperable digital services.

I recently discussed the current state of tech standards with DigiCert’s  Mike Nelson, Global Vice President of Digital Trust and, Dean Coclin, Senior Director of Trust Services, at DigiCert Trust Summit 2023. We drilled down on Matter as well as another new standard,  BIMI, which stands for “brand indicators for message?identification.” BIMI essentially is a carrot-on-a-stick mechanism designed to incentivize e-mail marketers to proactively engage in suppressing email spoofing. Here are my takeaways:

Matter picks up steam

Frustration with smart home devices should be much reduced in 2024. That’s because gadgets that bear the Matter logo are more readily available than ever.  Matter-compliant thermostats, pet cams, vacuum cleaners, kitchen appliances, TVs and security systems can no