Home Podcasts Videos Guest Posts Q&A My Take Bio Contact
 

For consumers

 

NEW TECH: CyberGRX seeks to streamline morass of third-party cyber risk assessments

By Byron V. Acohido

When Target fired both its CEO and CIO in 2014, it was a wake-up call for senior management.

The firings came as a result of a massive data breach which routed through an HVAC contractor’s compromised account. C-suite execs across the land suddenly realized something similar could happen to them. So they began inundating their third-party suppliers with “bespoke assessments” – customized cyber risk audits that were time consuming and redundant.

Out of that morass was born CyberGRX, a Denver, CO-based start-up that’s seeking to dramatically streamline third-party risk assessments, and actually turn them into a tool that can help mitigate cyber exposures.

I had the chance to visit with CyberGRX CEO Fred Kneip at RSA 2019 at San Francisco’s Moscone Center last week. He shared a telling anecdote about how CyberGRX got its start — essentially from backlash to the milestone Target breach.

Kneip also painted the wider context about why effective third-party cyber risk management is an essential ingredient to baking-in security at a foundational level. For a full drill down, please listen to the accompanying podcast. The key takeaways:

Rise of third parties

In 2016, Jay Leek – then CISO at the Blackstone investment firm, and now a CyberGRX board member —  was collaborating with CSOs at several firms Blackstone had invested in when a common theme came up. The CSOs couldn’t scale their third-party risk assessment programs to keep up with growth. The problem had become untenable.

The Target firings lit a fire under senior management to make third-party security audits standard practice. But they did so without taking into account the hockey-stick rise in reliance on third-party suppliers. No one thought deeply enough about how they were distributing privileged access to innumerable third-party vendors.

Facilities repairman, like the HVAC vendor, was a small part of this trend. The corporate sector’s pursuit of digital transformation had given rise to new cottage industries of third-party contractors for everything from payroll services, accounting systems and HR functions to productivity suites,  customer relationship services and analytics tools.

“Think about the CEO who’s overstretched and one step removed . . . the problem of how  third-parties might be exposing company data became, not so much neglected, as de-prioritized, even as companies became more and more dependent on these third party providers,” Kneip told me. …more

MY TAKE: Why the next web-delivered ad you encounter could invisibly infect your smartphone

By Byron V. Acohido

Google, Facebook and Amazon have gotten filthy rich doing one thing extremely well: fixating on every move each one of us makes when we use our Internet-connected computing devices.

Related: Protecting web gateways

The tech titans have swelled into multi-billion dollar behemoths by myopically focusing on delivering targeted online advertising, in support of online retailing. This has largely shaped the digital lives we’ve come to lead.

Turns out all of this online profiling has a dark side. Cybercriminals have begun escalating their efforts to bend the legitimate online advertising and retailing fulfillment ecosystem to their whims.

This development is unfolding largely off the radar screen of the website publishers who depend on this ecosystem, says Chris Olson, CEO of the Media Trust, a 15-year-old website security vendor, based in McLean, VA that is on the front lines of mitigating this seething threat.

Meanwhile, billions of consumers who participate in this ecosystem each minute of every day remain blissfully ignorant of how they are increasingly being placed in harm’s way, simply doing routine online activities, Olson told Last Watchdog.

Losing control of risk

Like most other pressing cybersecurity challenges today, the problem is rooted in digital transformation. Specifically, to make their digital operations ever more flexible and agile, enterprises have grown ever more reliant on third-party software developers. …more

MY TAKE: Here’s why the Internet Society’s new Privacy Code of Conduct deserves wide adoption

By Byron V. Acohido

When Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg infamously declared that privacy “is no longer a social norm” in 2010, he was merely parroting a corporate imperative that Google had long since established. That same year, then-Google CEO Eric Schmidt publicly admitted that Google’s privacy policy was to “get right up to the creepy line and not cross it.”

Related: Mark Zuckerberg’s intolerable business model.

We now know, of course, they weren’t kidding. Facebook’s pivotal role in the Cambridge Analytica scandal and Google getting fined $57 million last week by the French for violating Europe’s privacy rules are just two of myriad examples demonstrating how the American tech titans live by those credos.

But what if companies chose to respect an individual’s right to privacy, especially when he or she goes online? What if consumers could use search engines, patronize social media, peruse news and entertainment sites and use other internet-enabled services without abdicating all of their rights? What if companies stopped treating consumers as wellsprings of behavioral data – data to be voraciously mined and then sold to the highest bidder?

With Jan. 28 earmarked as Data Privacy Day —  an annual international privacy awareness campaign — these are reasonable questions to ask. These are ponderings that have been debated by captains of industry, government regulators, and consumer advocates in Europe and North America for the past decade and a half. …more

GUEST ESSAY: Australia’s move compelling VPNs to cooperate with law enforcement is all wrong

By Bogdan Patru

The moment we’ve all feared has finally come to pass. When government agencies and international intelligence groups pooled together resources to gather user data, the VPN’s encryption seemed like the light at the end of the tunnel.

Related: California enacts pioneering privacy law

However, it looks like things are starting to break apart now that Australia has passed the “Telecommunications and Other Legislation Amendment (Assistance and Access) Bill 2018”. On the 6th of December 2018, a law that is a direct attack on internet users’ privacy was agreed to by both the House of Representatives and the Senate.

The amendment forces all companies, even VPN providers, to collect and give away confidential user data if the police demand it. All telecoms companies will have to build tools in order to bypass their own encryption.

If suspicions appear that a crime has been or will be committed by one of their users, the law enforcement agencies are in their right to demand access to user messages and private data.

This Orwellian Thought Police is to be the judge, jury, and executioner in a digital world that shelters our personal lives and secrets. All the things we’d like to keep hidden from others. You know, this revolutionary idea called “privacy” Anyone?

Tech companies all over the world are unsure how this can be achieved without installing backdoors into their own security systems. These vulnerabilities are just like a stack of powder kegs ready to blow up at any moment. This is because anyone with knowledge of their existence could theoretically use those security holes to gain access to the user data. …more

MY TAKE: Why Satya Nadella is wise to align with privacy advocates on regulating facial recognition

By Byron V. Acohido

We’re just a month and change into the new year, and already there have been two notable developments underscoring the fact that some big privacy and civil liberties questions need to be addressed before continuing the wide-scale deployment of advanced facial recognition systems.

This week civil liberties groups in Europe won the right to challenge the UK’s bulk surveillance activities in the The Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights.

Related: Snowden on unrestrained surveillance

“The surveillance regime the UK government has built seriously undermines our freedom,” Megan Golding, a lawyer speaking for privacy advocates, stated. “Spying on vast numbers of people without suspicion of wrongdoing violates everyone’s right to privacy and can never be lawful.”

That development followed bold remarks made by none other than Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella just a few weeks earlier at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

Nadella expressed deep concern about facial recognition, or FR, being used for intrusive surveillance and said he welcomed any regulation that helps the marketplace “not be a race to the bottom.”

Ubiquitous surveillance

You may not have noticed, but there has been a flurry of breakthroughs in biometric technology, led by some leapfrog advances in facial recognition systems over the past couple of years. Now facial recognition appears to be on the verge of blossoming commercially, with security use-cases paving the way.

Last November,  SureID, a fingerprint services vendor based in Portland, Ore., announced a partnership with Robbie.AI, a Boston-based developer of a facial recognition system designed to be widely deployed on low-end cameras.

The partners aim to combine fingerprint and facial data to more effectively authenticate employees in workplace settings. And their grander vision is to help establish a nationwide biometric database in which a hybrid facial ID/fingerprint can be used for things such as fraud-proofing retail transactions, or, say, taking a self-driving vehicle for a spin.

However, the push back by European privacy advocates and Nadella’s call for regulation highlights the privacy and civil liberties conundrums advanced surveillance technologies poses. It’s a healthy thing that a captain of industry can see this. These are weighty issues …more

MY TAKE: Why companies should care about 2.2 billion stolen credentials circulating in easy reach

By Byron V. Acohido

Some chilling hard evidence has surfaced illustrating where stolen personal information ultimately ends up, once it has flowed through the nether reaches of the cyber underground.

Wired magazine reported this week on findings by independent security researchers who have been tracking the wide open availability of a massive cache of some 2.2 billion stolen usernames, passwords and other personal data.

Related: Massive Marriott breach closes out 2018

Ever wonder where the tens of millions of consumer records stolen from Marriott, Yahoo, Equifax, Dropbox, Linked In,  Target, Home Depot, Sony, Anthem, Premera Blue Cross, Uber and literally thousands of other organizations that have sustained major network breaches ends up?

This data gets collected and circulated in data bases that the thieves initially attempt to sell for big profits on the dark web, as reported by Motherboard. The work of these researchers shows how, at the end of the day, much of the stolen personal data eventually spills over into the open Internet, where it is free for the taking by  anyone with a modicum of computer skills.

Credential stuffing

The clear and present risk to the average consumer or small business owner is that his or her stolen account credentials will surface in one or more credential stuffing campaigns. This is where criminals deploy botnets to automate the injection of surreptitiously obtained usernames and password pairs until they gain fraudulent access to a targeted account. And once they do, they swiftly try to gain access to accounts on other popular services.

Reddit earlier this month acknowledged that credential stuffers locked down a “large group of accounts.” The social news aggregation site informed the victims that would need to reset their passwords to regain access, and, notably, advised them to choose strong, unique passwords. …more

MY TAKE: ‘Bashe’ attack theorizes a $200 billion ransomware raid using NSA-class cyber weapons

By Byron V. Acohido

A report co-sponsored by Lloyd’s of London paints a chilling scenario for how a worldwide cyberattack could trigger economic losses of some $200 billion for companies and government agencies ill-equipped to deflect a very plausible ransomware attack designed to sweep across the globe.

Related: U.S. cyber foes exploit government shutdown

The Cyber Risk Management (CyRiM) project lays out in detail how a theoretical ransomware attack – dubbed the “Bashe” campaign – could improve upon the real life WannaCry and NotPetya ransomware worms that plagued thousands of organizations in 2017.

The exercise was commissioned by Lloyd’s of London, the Cambridge Centre for Risk Studies and the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, among others. In their construct, the fictional cyber ring behind Bashe leverages lessons learned from missteps made in WannaCry and NotPetya, with the aim of making Bashe “the most infectious malware of all time.”

It should not be forgotten that WannaCry and NotPetya made use of some of the  69 cyber weapons stolen from the NSA and released publicly by a group known as Shadow Brokers. These weapons were designed by NSA software engineers to take advantage of heretofore undisclosed security vulnerabilities in Windows, Linux, IBM and other core operating systems and applications widely used in commerce and government.

EternalBlue pedigree

Keep in mind, globe-spanning ransomware worms are just one of endless ways the NSA weapons, often referred to as “EternalBlue,” could be leveraged. While the Lloyd’s study focuses on the ransomware scenario, it’s reasonable to believe threat actors of every stripe are developing other ways to utilize EternalBlue-class cyber weaponry.

This creates a responsibility for every organization to consider this report and assess what damage control might entail, says Darin Pendergraft, vice president of product marketing at STEALTHbits Technologies, a Hawthorne, NJ-based supplier of systems to protect sensitive company data. …more